“The History of Serbian-Russian Relations in the 19th and 20th Century”

11. April 2017.

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At the Andrić Institute, organized by the Department of History, on April 8, was held a scientific conference on “The History of Serbian-Russian Relations in the 19th and 20th Centuries”.

 

The scientific conference was organized to mark the hundred years since the disappearance of the Russian Empire and the birth of the first socialist state, a century of global fracture at the Eastern part of Europe.

 

Answers to questions about what happened before, during and after 1917, and what were the key features and events that marked the future path of development of relations between the two nations that have radically changed the form of government, were looking for a leading Serbian and Russian historians from renowned higher education and scientific research Foundation: Dr. Konstantin Nikiforov, director of the Institute for Slavic Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences and a visiting professor at the Moscow state University “M. V. Lomonosov “, Dr. Andrew L. Shemyakin, scientific adviser to the Institute of Slavic Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Višnjakov, prof. MGIMO, the Diplomatic Academy of MID RF, Dr. Goran Miloradović, senior research fellow at the Institute for Contemporary History, Dr. Aleksandar Silkin, senior research fellow at the Institute for Slavic Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Dr. Alexei Timofeyev, a senior research fellow at the Institute for Recent History of Serbia, Predrag Lažetić, Museum advisor to the Aviation Museum in Belgrade and Dr Miroslav Perišić, Head of the Department of History of the Andrić Institute.

 

Dr Miroslav Perišić, Head of the Department of History, said that relations between Russia and Serbia are relations of a great power and a small nation. “In the 19th century, Serbia began its struggle for liberation from Turkish rule, managed to fight for national independence and international recognition. At the same time in the Balkan world, Serbia managed to build its democratic institutions,” said Perisic told reporters, adding that the Balkans has always been a subject of interest of the great powers.

 

“This was the time when Serbia maintained contacts with other imperial capitals and in all that the Russian influence was very important. This influence had increased in the early 20th century, particularly during the period before the First World War and during World War II, the October Revolution, which significantly affected the events,” said Perišić.

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